Radioactive dating and the age of the earth

Simply counting the number of rings will give one a fairly good idea of the age of the tree.Periods of heavy rain and lots of sunshine will make larger gaps of growth in the rings, while periods of drought might make it difficult to count individual rings. When a given quantity of an isotope is created (in a supernovae, for example), after the half-life has expired, 50% of the parent isotope will have decomposed into daughter isotopes.

In the 1660s Nicolas Steno formulated our modern concepts of deposition of horizontal strata.

It has become increasingly clear that these radiometric dating techniques agree with each other and as a whole, present a coherent picture in which the Earth was created a very long time ago.

Further evidence comes from the complete agreement between radiometric dates and other dating methods such as counting tree rings or glacier ice core layers.

Trees undergo spurts in growth in the spring and summer months while becoming somewhat dormant in the fall and winter months.

When a tree is cut down, these periods are exhibited in a cross section of the trunk in the form of rings.

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