Dating violence facts you shoud know

Dating abuse is a pattern of abusive behaviors -- usually a series of abusive behaviors over a course of time -- used to exert power and control over a dating partner.

Every relationship is different, but the things that unhealthy and abusive relationships have in common are issues of power and control.

If something makes you uncomfortable, scared or threatened, you could be experiencing the warning signs of an unhealthy relationship. Teen Dating Awareness Month February is Teen Dating Awareness Month.

There are multiple types of abuse, including: mental, emotional, sexual, digital, financial, spiritual/cultural and physical. Focus on your friend, not on their abusive partner. Be prepared with information about community resources that could give them information and guidance. For years, young people across the nation have organized to put a stop to dating abuse.

Dating violence can be experienced in many different ways and can affect all types of relationships.

Whether you are in a long-term committed relationship or a causal one you can still experience abuse. Avoid telling them, “Everything will be okay.” This statement minimizes the incidents and are things you have no control over.

Sometimes abusive behavior does not cause pain or even leave a bruise, but it’s still unhealthy. Let them share whatever they are comfortable sharing with you. Help your friend recognize that abuse is not normal and that it is not their fault. Do not attempt to confront the abusive partner or tell the victim that you will confront them. With their adult allies, they achieved a major victory in 2005 when the importance of addressing teen dating abuse was highlighted in the re authorization of the Violence Against Women Act.

Each type of abuse is serious and no one deserves to experience it in any form. Acknowledge their feelings and be respectful of their decisions. The following year, Congress followed the lead of dozens of national, state and local organizations in sounding the call to end dating abuse.

Both include hitting, yelling, threatening, name calling and other forms of verbal, sexual, emotional and physical abuse.In a nationwide survey, 9.4 percent of high school students report being hit, slapped, or physically hurt on purpose by their boyfriend or girlfriend in the 12 months prior to the survey. Dating violence is controlling, abusive, and aggressive behavior in a romantic relationship. It can include verbal, emotional, physical, or sexual abuse, or a combination.Questions to ask in identifying abusive behavior: Are you unable to disagree with him/her?Does your partner put you down, but then tell you he/she loves you?

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